how america’s politicization of the coronavirus has led us to death

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The best way for me to get enraged enough about a topic to dedicate an entire post to it is by watching the news. I feel that I’m not alone in thinking “how did we get here”, every time I watch the news or read about how this administration is letting people die while they politicize everything. We all know politics, especially in the current state of America, can be extremely polarizing. The fact that we have allowed or that political leaders have encouraged the politicization of everything should scare us. It scares me, especially since it has led to the death of hundreds of thousands of people. And now, with the coronavirus as the “fight for science”, we have only seen the government politicizing exacerbated. What does this mean for the future of America? Why is this dangerous and worthy of examination? In what ways should we be politicizing the coronavirus?

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let’s talk about the united states postal service

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I’ve had this topic and post idea in my mind for a while, but this issue has been in the news a little more than usual, which gave me the push to talk about it. I think that a lot of us take the postal service for granted or don’t truly understand its value to our society. Now that it’s being threatened and at risk, we are all waking up to what life would be like without it. And with everything going on *cough cough* COVID-19, the last thing we need is an under-appreciated postal service to dissolve.

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how voter suppression is a danger to our democracy

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I had to double-check to make sure that I haven’t already written about this topic because it’s something that I think and talks a lot about. Voter suppression is a very dangerous and serious topic, especially now that the coronavirus is further aiding suppressive efforts by those trying to hamper voters. In my post how the coronavirus is testing our election system, I touch a little bit on its impact on voter suppression. However, this post is going to go much deeper into the issue, COVID-19’s heightening effects, and how it is a danger to the country and its values. As always, there will be several resources and articles at the end of this post, for further education. You can also click here to read more of my posts about the coronavirus or here to read more on voting.

 

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does calling congress do anything?

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If you are interested in politics or social justice, but you don’t have the kind of platform to introduce legislation or talk on tv, you have a problem heard the suggestion, call your representative, and tell them your grievances. If you are under 18 and can’t vote (LIKE ME) oftentimes, it’s hard to actively effect change. However, ads and Instagram are not slow to let you know that you can call congress or your elected officials. But how effective is that? I honestly never thought about the process or effect that calling congress does. Now I know that it’s not that simple. In this post, I’m going to cover the behind the scenes process of calling an elected official, the history of it, and whether or not it’s worth it. After all, if it’s our right to advocate for ourselves and our ideas, then maybe we should know more about it.

 

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how the coronavirus is testing our election system

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I know that I’ve been talking about the coronavirus a lot, but my blog is largely impacted by current events, and the coronavirus gives me a lot to think and write about. You can click here to read my other posts about the coronavirus if you are interested in the politics and the social impacts of the virus. However, this post is going to focus and go in-depth on one of the topics I mentioned in those posts. Elections. Not just the elections but the recent changes, the state governments, and the voters themselves. If you have followed me on this blog for a while, you would know how passionate I am about voting and the election system (even though I can’t vote yet). It should be no surprise that I have more than a few thoughts on what’s happening to current elections amid the coronavirus and social distancing. As always, I will provide some articles and resources for more information at the end of the post and feel free to comment on your thoughts as well!

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helping out at the voting polls.

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Anyway, last election day, November 5th, I was an election page. In this post I’m going to discuss what I did, what I noticed and the experience as a whole. I know that I’ve been writing a lot about voting lately, but it’s because I have so much to say. Especially with this new experience, I want to share my thoughts and participation with the voting process. Let me know what other options I should discuss or if you want more voting things!

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before you vote.

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The Election is coming up! I know that I already did a post about voting, and I will definitely be doing more in the future, but a final reminder post would be good. Not only is this a reminder for everyone that is eligible to vote, it’s a resource page. I found a bunch of great resources that answer questions like what to bring on election day, where to go, how to decided who to vote for, etc. This post is a simplified guide to the basics of voting this Tuesday.

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let’s talk about voting

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I don’t know about any of you under 18-year-olds, but I CAN’T WAIT UNTIL I can vote! It’s one of those things that I have been looking forward to for such a long time. Despite MY dreams of voting, it’s surprisingly an under-discussed topic. Now more than ever, voting and getting EVERYONE to vote is important. I cannot tell you how many times I have heard someone say, “Yeah, I’ll be able to vote, but I don’t know if I want to”. This post is going to be all about why people say that, fixing those problems, why voting is important and giving you some educational resources. I also need to disclaim that I am going to talk about my own personal beliefs about certain incapable presidents, but the factual information is still important – to be even more clear, there are unbiased informational links at the bottom.  

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