a global feminist book list

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Some of you may know that I am currently doing an Independent Study Class about global feminism and gender imperialism. You might want to read my post about confronting western feminism and motherhood. When I was creating the “syllabus” or list of books and literature that I wanted to read, I struggled. I had a lot of trouble finding books and textbooks that fit my criteria and talked about the topics I wanted to discuss. I included a little information about my criteria when looking for these books at the end of this post, in case anyone was interested. A little background, I am learning about the feminist history of different parts of the world, feminist movements in history, the connection to gender imperialism but, my takeaways so far have exceeded that. At the end of my class, I will do a full post on my takeaways and advice to aspiring global feminists. Overall, this post is my book list of books and authors that I wish someone told me about when I was younger and developing an interest in feminism. Please leave any additions to the book list in the comment section below, and feel free to share any thoughts or comments!

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feminism: motherhood vs. sisterhood

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I know the election is probably what everyone is focusing on right now, but I’m not ready to write about it yet. So here’s another post about global feminism. If you read my “why don’t we confront western feminism” post, then you probably know that this semester I am taking an independent study class about global feminism and challenging western perspectives in feminism. I’ve been writing and reflecting and LEARNING so much in that class, that it’s been difficult to find the right time to write a post. However, I want to share with you some of the big things I learned in the past few weeks, specifically about these ideas. Before I took this class, I didn’t realize that there was anything special about sisterhood. I learned that The western idea of sisterhood and the African idea of motherhood and Latin American idea of motherhood are all different, and expose this false idea of a “universal female experience”. In this post, I’m going to talk about global feminism and western feminism, and the different perspectives on motherhood. As always, the books and resources that sparked this post will be at the end of the post, but a book list will be coming with the completion of my class.

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why do we avoid confronting western feminism?

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Hopefully, this post is going to make a lot of the feminists and global citizens better and more conscious of the realities of the world and women. This semester, I had the opportunity to create my own independent study class and curriculum. Something I’ve started becoming more dedicated to is furthering my feminist knowledge and awareness. This mainly meant that I wanted to know what other cultures, countries, parts of the world I have missed out on learning due to my western and euro-centric learnings, and bubble. As feminists, we often learn about Betty Friedan, Simone de Beauvoir, and Mary Wollstonecraft. That becomes our idea of feminism. However, this western bubble limits our understanding and creates a harmful ignorance, and weakens our feminism. Within the first week of learning about unacknowledged parts of feminism, my western mindset was burst. For example, I had never truly examined the connotations of monogamy that differ from Europe, where it is considered unacceptable, to some African countries, where it gave women opportunities to work and co-parent. This post is meant to be a wakeup call and introduction to the sides of feminism that we don’t acknowledge, and the feminism we forget about.

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