the 19th amendment did not the end the fight for voting rights

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This past week was the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment. As we celebrate this milestone in the women’s suffrage movement, it’s especially important to recognize the reality and restrictions of the amendment as it pertains to women and people of color. We often overlook the harsh actualities of history, while only focuses on the surface meaning. I don’t want to diminish the significance of the 19th amendment or its place in women’s rights’ history. Rather, I want to ensure that we give attention to the Americans who had to wait 32 – 45 years to vote. In this post, I am going to give a brief history of voting rights as it pertains to people and women of color. Even further, I want to make sure that we all remain aware that the fight for voting rights still exists and requires our action.

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does calling congress do anything?

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If you are interested in politics or social justice, but you don’t have the kind of platform to introduce legislation or talk on tv, you have a problem heard the suggestion, call your representative, and tell them your grievances. If you are under 18 and can’t vote (LIKE ME) oftentimes, it’s hard to actively effect change. However, ads and Instagram are not slow to let you know that you can call congress or your elected officials. But how effective is that? I honestly never thought about the process or effect that calling congress does. Now I know that it’s not that simple. In this post, I’m going to cover the behind the scenes process of calling an elected official, the history of it, and whether or not it’s worth it. After all, if it’s our right to advocate for ourselves and our ideas, then maybe we should know more about it.

 

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