let’s talk about the missing diversity in english class

classics

 

I was recently reminded of the blatant lack of diversity that still plagues our classrooms. I go through this every year. Back to school sales are popping up as everyone prepares for next year. No matter how unconventional that year is going to be, students are preparing and buying supplies. Among those supplies are books for English and literature classes. As I viewed my list of required books for the year, I wasn’t even surprised that all of them, but one, were written by white men. I have written posts before about problematic aspects of literature, this post is going to focus on its role in classrooms.

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why can’t i find a book written by author of color?

Minority books

 

I love books a lot. I specifically love gender studies, political ideology, and classics. However, I noticed something recently as I was looking for more books to read during this quarantine. All of the books I’m looking at are written by white men. And the books that haven’t been written by white people are books that focus on race. It’s hard to find a simple politics book written by someone than a white guy. Not to say that I don’t enjoy books about racial relationships, but why aren’t there more minority authors writing a variety of books. Why aren’t more minorities becoming authors and writers in general? That’s what I’m going to try to figure out in this post. You can click here to read my booklist about some of my favorite books written by minority authors and some of my favorite minority authors.

 

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my book list written by minorities

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I was planning and writing a blog post about two of my favorite topics, minority representation, and books! This post is going to be the intro to that bigger and more serious posts. I wanted to do this booklist first to be a little more optimistic and because what better to do, since we are all in quarantine than reading!!! I’m going to share some of my favorite books written by minority authors, with a range of genres. I’m also just going to share some authors that have written too many great books to list, but I still wanted to include. Additionally, I will leave links to each book in case you want to purchase them. Feel free to leave any book recommendations in the comments, because I’m always looking for new ones.

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my political book guide

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During this quarantine period, I made the plan to read… A LOT. I normally read a pretty good amount outside of school, usually a new book a week, but I’m taking advantage of all this free time to read even more. Although the first book is the only political nonfiction book I’ve read during this period so far, I wanted to make a small list of my all-time favorites that I have found very useful and enlightening. I wrote a feminist book guide, but these focus more on politics and international relations.

 

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was jane austen a feminist?

janeausten (1)

 

I recently wrote a post about classic literature and feminism. I hinted at a blog post dedicated to classic authors like Henry James and Jane Austen. Throughout the past few months, I have read a lot of classic books for fun. That might seem a little crazy to some people, a year ago it would’ve sounded crazy to me, but I’ve found a new love for classics. However, while reading these books, a lot of questions came into my mind because as a feminist, there are some things I think about all the time. While reading, my feminist mind made me think about whether these books could be feminist novels, even if the authors weren’t feminists (and vice versa). The question I want to focus on today, Was Jane Austen really a feminist? And now that I have read most of her books and done research into her life, and I think I have my answer. 

 

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let’s talk about classic literature and feminism

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I love books. When I’m not reading, I’m online looking at thrift books. I particularly like classics and gender studies. But this post is not about gender studies books. After reading books like The Bell Jar and The Portrait of a Lady, I was left with a lot of thoughts and questions. Does having a strong female character makes a book feminist? Does having a feminist author make a book feminist? Can a book still be feminist if the author isn’t one? What if it’s white feminism? Does that mean as much if it was from the 1800s? I don’t know. But hopefully, we can start to think more about it.

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